Reparations And Unionization In The Great City Of Chicago

Chicago is making headlines right now in two cutting edge, money-related ways at once.

Jill Talbot’s ‘The Way We Weren’t’ Describes Single Parenting and Privation in Academia

When I asked Talbot if she had any advice to share for Billfold readers considering a career in academia, she laughed for a very long time and then asked me to quote her as “laughing for a very long time.”

Bagging Groceries in Greenwich

Matt Debenham is a writer, a parent, a teacher, and now he works at a grocery store too.

What It Means to ‘Lean In’ as a Waitress in Vegas

Is there any job a woman could do that would disqualify her from being a feminist?

Undercompensated in Academia

I grew up in an academic household, and academia was a goal of mine from an early age. Both my parents are musicians teaching in academia, and while I also loved to perform, I had decided in college that I would probably follow in my parents’ footsteps and pursue teaching on a university level.

National Adjunct Walkout Day

Today is National Adjunct Walkout Day, and it seems like the worries about campus security were unwarranted.

When An Adjunct Gets An Unlucky Break

I usually teach three courses per semester, three credits each. $633 per credit, which comes out to $5700 for a four month term. I am not the primary money person in our family, thank goodness. But the money I earn takes care of all the non-essentials of life: piano lessons, trips, new tires.

Buying Power

I spent the summer working full-time for my old college with the bright promise of my new job around the corner. I calculated what I still needed to purchase, the expenses I would have before my first check in September, and I realized I had $500 to spend on new school clothes for the kids.

To say this felt like a miracle would not be an overstatement.

Catching a Break After Years of Barely Making Ends Meet

For the last seven years, I’ve been an adjunct professor of writing at three different institutions, while raising three kids mostly on my own. At the University of Oregon, that meant an annual, full-time salary of $27,000, though they offered me great benefits. At other schools, my salary ranged from $2,000/class to $4,000/class, though my cap was typically four or five classes a year, and never any work in the summer. This meant many summers (which would sometimes stretch to fall) on food stamps supplemented with a few trips to the food bank. It meant shopping at Goodwill, borrowing money from my mom or brother, floating checks, free lunch applications, payday loans. It also meant that I relied on friends for non-monetary help, too: picking up my kids from theater or chess, or getting groceries after I had back surgery, or just letting me vent and worry aloud about how hard it was to make ends meet.

Injured While Adjuncting

Linda Lee is a part-time faculty member who slipped on ice and fell at a university where she was teaching. She recently wrote an informative post at The Adjunct Project on worker’s compensation from the perspective as an injured adjunct.